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Ishita Marwah

Writer, Clinician, Immunologist, Reader

Ishita Marwah is a clinician/Immunology researcher at Imperial College London by week, and a writer by weekend. She has been writing since the age of eight and her stories have won her several awards, including a meeting with the President of India. Her short-story 'A little history of love' was recently short-listed for the inaugural BAME prize organised jointly by the Guardian and 4th Estate Books, an imprint of Harper Collins Publishers. She has guest-edited a Times of India supplement (Education Times), been recognised at the Tata Lit Live festival, been short-listed for the Desi Writers’ Lounge Dastaan Award, and won the DNA-Sulekha Me nationwide short story contest. She lives and works in London and dreams and writes of India; while studying at the University of Oxford, she regularly contributed to the Oxford student, had her work published in the annual anthology of Oxford-based creative writing group The Failed Novelists, and was short-listed to read her work by Mark Haddon, of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time fame. She is an expert maker of bedside and in-bed book mountains, and a lover of cake and dogs.
Let's Stop Dragging Mothers, Daughters And Sisters Into Every Zoonar RF via Getty Images

Let's Stop Dragging Mothers, Daughters And Sisters Into Every Conflict

From very early on in my childhood, I have memories of Indian men invoking the character of the women--usually mothers, daughters, sisters--of their adversaries to settle scores. In the more innocuous setting of middle-class living rooms, tales of female misfortune were accompanied by a great, slow shaking of heads, and an expressed inability to understand men who behaved "this way" towards women; didn't they have mothers, sisters, daughters of their own at home?
26/04/2016 8:35 AM IST