SUSTAINABILITY

Prof Veena Sahajwalla

Meet The Woman Who Wants To Help India ‘Reform Waste’

In January this year, the ‘Guardian’ profiled Professor Veena Sahajwalla as “the woman who loves garbage.” Ever since her growing up days in Mumbai, Veena was fascinated by waste because she saw it as a hidden resource waiting to be tapped into. Today, her pioneering work completely transformed the way the properties of carbon-bearing materials are understood, including discarded graphites, plastics and rubber tyres. She has received international acclaim for inventing “green steel”.
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The Endless Refrain For The Foreign-Returned: ‘We Have It In India Too'

On one of my recent visits in India, I was desperate to eat "phuchka". While my father shook his head in dismay at the prospect of contracting digestive disorders, my mother laughed and encouraged me to seek out my friends for the adventure. Every phone call ended in disappointment. No one wanted phuchka or egg rolls or momos; instead, they came up with the best pizza and burger places in town.
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Why Online Shopping Is Not Nearly As Good As The Real Thing

I know you can order clothes, try them on and return them if you don't fancy them. But just imagine the courier boy hanging around the door when you're trying out stuff. I don't even take the husband for shopping because I don't want to be hurried through this meditative process. Moreover, what a wasteful exercise! I know of people who have tried and returned stuff that made its way into their doorstep from across the seas. I'm someone who counts my carbon footprint...
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Why India's Demand For UN Tax Committee Holds The Key To Funding The Paris Deal

Achieving the goal of the Paris Agreement will require a major shift away from the fossil fuel-based economies of today to a more sustainable and green economy. Such a transition, needless to say, will be enormously expensive. The main source of financing will be public funds, essentially raised through taxation by the government. It is here that an ongoing reform effort at the United Nations must be brought into the picture -- the campaign for an intergovernmental tax committee.
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Reframing Sustainability: Don't Be ‘Less Bad', Aspire To Flourish

Somewhere along the way vikas (development) became a one-dimensional concept for many, focused primarily on individual or organisational progress (profit) and the inherent interconnectedness of all things, of life, was forgotten. We are meant to be living in the age of sustainability, and in this regard, India is certainly in its infancy. In conversations I have had with business leaders in the private sector, it appears that the word sustainability is not fully understood, has lost its meaning. To many, it has come to mean being less bad.
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Demystifying The Sustainable Development Goals

An absence of a sense of ownership or understanding of these goals by individuals and institutions may become an impediment in the journey towards achieving them. So the question I found myself asking (as I'm sure many individuals and institutions have asked) is what do these SDGs (which are essentially vision statements) mean to me? What can I do? How does it align with me or my organisation's vision or commitment to sustainable development? Or, alternatively, how do I align myself or my organisation with these goals?
Kailash Satyarthi

Why We Must Invest In Education For A Sustainable Society

A sustainable society stands on four pillars -- people, planet, prosperity and peace. Education is the seal that binds these pillars individually and jointly. Sadly, today less than 4% of global aid goes for education. We need US$22 billion to send every child to school. This equals 4.5 days of annual military expenditure. Do we need soldiers more than teachers, armies more than educated citizens?
Milaap

Solar Bore-Well to Solve Water Problems of SECMOL University, Ladakh

Formed in 1988 to reform the educational system of Ladakh, SECMOL today creates opportunities for rural Ladakhi youth, and promotes sustainable living. Their aim is to help present and future generations of Ladakhis benefit from education and adopt a symbiotic relationship with their environment, stalling the impact of global warming and pollution on Ladakh's sensitively balanced ecosystem.