PARIS ATTACKS

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Why Iran Is Key For Ending The Middle East Crisis

With Iran having resolved its nuclear dispute with the international community, it is now possible for the West to usher in a new era of collaboration with the country involving not just economic cooperation but an equally important parallel effort aimed at neutralising the threat posed by radical Sunni fundamentalism in the region. As the protector of "all Shiites", Iran has an obvious incentive for cooperating in any campaign against such forces...
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19-Century Anarchists, Western Capitalism, And The Paris Attacks

Attacks by anarchists on political and civil targets created persistent anxiety in Paris throughout the 1890s. They arose from a theory of the "propaganda of the deed", according to which spectacular acts of assault would seize media attention and so galvanise others who shared the feeling that modern society had become intolerable. Such violence wreaked by French citizens (and other Europeans) on the everyday fabric of French society all but disappeared during the 20th century... But in the 21st century, Paris has learned that lost feeling again, this time on a more terrible scale.

The ‘Charlie Hebdo' Conundrum

On the anniversary of the attack that killed most of the staff in its Paris office, French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdopublished a controversial special edition featuring on its cover a sketch of a bearded, bloodstained God-like feature in sandals with a Kalashnikov slung over his shoulder, accompanied by the headline, "One year on: the killer is still at large". The Vatican has raised strong objections to the depiction, triggering yet another debate on the magazine's brand of satire.

Fairytales And Not-So-Happy Endings: Talking To Kids About Terror

This Thursday is the seventh anniversary of the ghastly day on which Mumbai was mercilessly attacked by a bunch of spineless men who succeeded in terrorising and breaking the heart of our vibrant metropolis. The Paris attacks remind us once again of how vulnerable we all are to the evils of this world. If your children are at an age where they are aware of the senseless atrocities that took place this month or at any other time, it is likely that they will ask questions.
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I Have A Problem With Aamir Khan's Remarks Too, But Not For The Usual Reason

I finally watched the infamous Aamir Khan clip that has caused this nationwide neurosis over tolerance (or intolerance, depending on which side of the fence you are on). I have to admit it really got my dander up. Not the intolerance bit. As usual, we Indians have been obsessing over a triviality. The part I found cringe-worthy was where he tries to dissociate religious ideology from terrorism.
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Where Survival Is Religion, Is There Really Time To Hate?

For five days I was away from the world, without newspapers, clocks, alarms, doorbells and television. But during a trek up in the mountains, the cell phone caught a whiff of network - that's when we came to know of the Paris attacks. Along with the news, I read enough comments dripping with hatred and suspicion to wish the network away. Thankfully, the cell phone tower obliged and I sunk back into oblivion. But the sharp words kept gnawing at me.
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Please Don't Turn Away Refugees, America. It's Not American

This is a country built by immigrants and even after 25 years here, I still idealise the famous inscription on The Statue of Liberty: "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free." But since the 13 November terror attacks in Paris by Islamist extremists, which killed some 130 people, a majority of people in America have rejected the idea of admitting refugees from Syria, a national poll by Bloomberg Politics shows.
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Changing Facebook Profile Pictures To Mourn Paris Attacks Is An Empty Gesture

To view the Paris massacre as meriting an act of charity (by giving away what was earlier one's own --a profile picture!) on social media is regressive "political messaging" -- not an act of solidarity. It views the dead as simply eliciting a moral-emotional response, while brushing away the weight of political conscience into the backyards of history. It can be an outlet for outrage, but it is separated from every claim to solidarity by the very space of reason.