NATURE

Fire boat response crews battle the blazing remnants of the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon, off Louisiana, in this handout photograph taken on April 21, 2010 and obtained on April 22. The oil drilling rig that had burned for 36 hours in the Gulf of Mexico sank Thursday as hopes dimmed for 11 missing workers and the risk of a major oil spill loomed, officials said. Picture taken April 21, 2010. REUTERS/U.S. Coast Guard/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS

New Studies Show How The 2010 Gulf Oil Spill Still Starves Fish At Sea And Plants On Shore

Jeffrey Short has been asking the same question for nearly three decades: What happened to the herring? After the 1989 Exxon-Valdez oil spill off Alaska's southern coast, the fish ― a vital link in th...
Amit Vaidya

The Farther From Religion You Go, The Closer To Nature You Get

I don't say this as an atheist or as a believer but as someone exploring the land of our vast country. Whenever I saw a temple, a dargah, a church, I noticed that while the property itself was always immaculate, the surrounding areas were bereft of nature. Instead they were surrounded by retail establishments set up to satiate the needs and demands of the faithful; often, I’d see garbage piled up, generally comprising abandoned puja trays and the detritus of worship (among other things).