ANIMAL FIGHTING

STRDEL via Getty Images

A Sanction For Abuse: Govt's Stand On Jallikattu Bull Festival Is Against Law And Humanity

The Centre has shown that it is impossible to practise politics without some measure of subterfuge. In a notification dated 7 January 2016, the Central Government allowed the use of bulls in jallikattu and bullock cart races in the name of tradition, which is in flagrant opposition to a ruling by the Hon'ble Supreme Court that banned the use of bulls in such events.
AFP via Getty Images

Cruel, Unusual And Illegal: Why Goa Should Not Lift The Ban On Bullfighting

India has banned bullfights since 1960 under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act because of the discomfort and unnecessary pain and suffering that bull owners mete out to these gentle creatures. However, several politicians and governments have been trying to circumvent the constitution by legalising bullfights. The latest is the Government of Goa, which has formed a house committee to explore the possibility of reversing the ban on bullfights, locally known as "dhirio".
STRDEL via Getty Images

A Fight To The Finish: The Case Against Animals For Entertainment

Animal fights for entertainment are a result of an indulgence in bloodlust by human beings who exploit this 'animalistic' instinct towards violence (or is it survival?) through fear, coercion and inordinate torture. Animals who are selected to fight are often left without food, water or shelter and are usually subjected to physical violence during the training period to incite aggressive behaviour.

SPONSORED BY AIRTEL BUSINESS