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How My 8-Year-Old Made A Bully Find Compassion

23/04/2015 8:13 AM IST | Updated 15/07/2016 8:25 AM IST
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Pic courtesy: Lizzi Rogers for #1000Speak

With the great response that #1000Speak for Compassion received on February 20, bloggers from across the world have decided to make this a monthly event. After all, the more we talk about compassion, the more we are likely incorporate it in our lives. This month's spotlight is on Building from Bullying.

To tell you the truth, bullying as a topic makes me react with anger. I have suffered bullying in my childhood. But what hits me even more is when my kids are picked on. I have written extensively about bullying on my blog (see here, here and here). I think of myself as a compassionate person. But when I see another person hit out and bully someone I love, it is hard for me to feel empathy for them.

In this blog I'd like to talk about how my younger son (now 8), who has faced a lot of bullying for different reasons, handled a recent challenge and taught me something really valuable.

Last year, my husband and I took the decision of making our son repeat his class. Let me clarify here that he did not fail or even do badly academically. But being a few months younger for his class, he was finding it hard to keep up with the pace of the curriculum. He was in first grade. I did not want him to be stressed with studies. He is a bright child, but he had to put in more hours just to keep up. And that broke my heart.

"Some of them openly called him a 'failure' and other names that made him feel miserable. He was bending over backwards to defend himself."

As parents, both of us were worried about how he would take it, as well as about his peers since he was continuing in the same school. We spoke to the school counsellor who was very supportive of this decision. She said that with our support and that of his teachers, we could help him make a smooth transition. His teacher had her doubts but offered to facilitate in whatever way she could.

I must tell you that I was immensely nervous when he re-joined school. The initial few days were a bit rough for him. His classmates who had gone ahead had many questions. Some of them openly called him a "failure" and other names that made him feel miserable. He was bending over backwards to defend himself. His new classmates were fine. Slowly he started making friends. My husband and I tried our best to help him cope. We encouraged him to speak about every small angst. My elder son took special care to keep an eye on any bullies especially in the school bus. Slowly, he integrated in his new class and found good friends. And best of all, he blossomed, loving his curriculum. My husband and I felt validated.

school bully

But, there were still stray incidents of people teasing him. I tried my best to prepare him for any questions that he may still face. I felt he went into a defense mode to try and explain that he had not failed. This made him vulnerable to those who wanted a moment of fun at his expense. Then a few days back, he told me an anecdote that warmed my heart.

"My son figured out a way to reach out to the humaneness in another person. He handled it so much better than I could have ever taught him."

A friend of his, a classmate, was quizzing him about his age. Anticipating what was about to follow, he told the friend upfront that he had repeated a year because he was younger for his class by a few months. He ended by asking his friend to please not make fun of him.

This made the other boy smile who in turn told him that it was no big deal. He himself had repeated a year albeit in kindergarten and in another school. This made them both laugh and bond.

I saw how my son figured out a way to reach out to the humaneness in another person. He handled it so much better than I could have ever taught him. It does not work always. But, it is an approach worth trying.

Do you have any such tips to share about bullying?

Join 1000 Voices Speak for Compassion on Facebook

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Follow @1000Speak on Twitter

This post has been previously published in a slightly different form on Rachna says.

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