Nature

Fire boat response crews battle the blazing remnants of the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon, off Louisiana, in this handout photograph taken on April 21, 2010 and obtained on April 22. The oil drilling rig that had burned for 36 hours in the Gulf of Mexico sank Thursday as hopes dimmed for 11 missing workers and the risk of a major oil spill loomed, officials said. Picture taken April 21, 2010. REUTERS/U.S. Coast Guard/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENERGY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS

New Studies Show How The 2010 Gulf Oil Spill Still Starves Fish At Sea And Plants On Shore

Jeffrey Short has been asking the same question for nearly three decades: What happened to the herring? After the 1989 Exxon-Valdez oil spill off Alaska's southern coast, the fish ― a vital link in th...
Amit Vaidya

The Farther From Religion You Go, The Closer To Nature You Get

I don't say this as an atheist or as a believer but as someone exploring the land of our vast country. Whenever I saw a temple, a dargah, a church, I noticed that while the property itself was always immaculate, the surrounding areas were bereft of nature. Instead they were surrounded by retail establishments set up to satiate the needs and demands of the faithful; often, I’d see garbage piled up, generally comprising abandoned puja trays and the detritus of worship (among other things).
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A Climate Change Warning From 5 Years Ago: The Ladakh Floods Of 2010

August 6, 2010. It was around midnight when the clouds above Ladakh burst. Jolted from their sleep the men, women and children saw water gushing into their homes, taking with it all that came in its path. Three weeks later, I packed my bags with everything that I thought the people there would need and started on a journey that would change me. Today I want to share with you what a seemingly small 2 degree change in climate could do to thousands of lives.
Ankita Shreeram

Flirting With The Redstart In Kanatal (Pictures)

In the mountains, it's eternally early morning. Fingers of mist, unbroken serenity and unearthly beauty reign through the day in the lofty strongholds, immune from the sun's tendency to unveil. So when I think back to my time in Kanatal, Uttarakhand, the memories are bound to two timeframes -- the wee hours of the morning and the late hours of the night. It was during the former that my encounters with the white-capped water redstart began.
Sejal Worah

Podcast: Letting Nature Be - How A Woman Saved A Hill In Mussoorie

This episode of The Intersection brings the story of Sejal Worah, World Wildlife Foundation India's programme director, a woman who single-handedly revived the ecosystem of Mussoorie's Flag Hill. There's a lot of determination and some of childhood nostalgia (she grew up in the vicinity of Flag Hill) in her story of how she saved an entire hill. But the key takeaway is how nature can often heal itself.
Audiomatic

Podcast: The Origins Of Organic Food And Why We Should Take It More Seriously

The science of nutrition is, and always has been, a confounding mess. Are carbohydrates good or bad? Do you really need to banish fat from your diet? Can salt actually cause irreparable harm? The answer to these questions changes every few years. Add to this the plethora of diets that keep coming in and going out of fashion every few months, and you're left confused about what really is healthy. However, the one trend that has been consistent is the organic food movement.
Tetra Images via Getty Images

Solo Female Travel: To Go Or Not To Go?

As you finally broach the topic of setting out solo, there's a sequence of reactions from the family. It starts with the calm before the storm, an air of hushed incomprehension. Then the eyebrows go up a fraction. And then all hell breaks loose. There are cackles of disbelief, wails of lament. How can our daughter even think this way? Could a demon have possessed her? Hope is reposed in divine forces. God will help us, he will cure her of these unholy thoughts.
DESHAKALYAN CHOWDHURY via Getty Images

How To Be At Home On A Holiday

There used to be a time when I preferred staying in luxurious hotels or resorts while on vacation. The hotels did great and still do fine, but I wanted some more flexibility. Those rigid check-in and check-out times didn't always gel well with my travel plans. Also having young kids meant that I wanted something more homely with access to essentials like milk, fruit and medicines too.