India Women's Rights

Zubin Shroff via Getty Images

The Womanhood Penalty: 5 Behaviours That Show Corporate India Has Some Serious Growing Up To Do

As a vice-president advising one of India's best-known companies, I was once asked to leave the room so a very senior member could crack an inappropriate joke. I was the only woman in the room, needless to say. Let's face it, corporate India isn't used to seeing women in positions of power. I've learnt to expect some curiosity, some inelegance and many awkward moments. Here's my list of workplace woes that illustrate how corporate India has a lot of growing up to do.
Westend61 via Getty Images

Will I Die A Contented Woman?

It's Women's Day. Around the premises, I see women wishing each other happiness and strength. Feeling my eyes moisten, I leave my desk to withdraw to my Fortress of Solitude--the washroom. Locking myself in the corner-most cubicle, I pull down the seat cover. I feel warm tears rolling down my face as I sit. Before I can make sense of the deluge, the events of the previous evening inundate my head.
Peathegee Inc via Getty Images

Serendipity 2.0: Making Our Own Magic Happen

Smartphones and social networks have brought the world to our fingertips, giving voice to many who would have otherwise remained unheard. It is up to us, now, to exercise the choice and freedom that technology affords us to get out of our comfort zone. Today, we can choose. To listen and be heard. To discover the world, and ourselves. To discover the magic of human connections and the incredible possibilities they represent.
Daniele Romeo - Photographer & Traveller via Getty Images

Measuring The Social Poverty Of Women

When we think about poverty, we presume that the poor, whether men or women, boys or girls are equally poor. The truth is that women experience poverty differently and more acutely. Women (and girls) are naturally assigned to domestic roles and this limits their access to formal education and knowledge. This, along with deep-rooted social and family hierarchies, limits their access to material resources, but more importantly to social resources, i.e. participation in economic, political and social decision-making. I call the latter the social poverty of women.

SPONSORED BY THE LIVE, LOVE, LAUGH FOUNDATION