Festival

BUNOL, SPAIN - AUGUST 30: Revellers enjoy the atmosphere in tomato pulp while participating the annual Tomatina festival on August 30, 2017 in Bunol, Spain. An estimated 22,000 people threw 150 tons of ripe tomatoes in the world's biggest tomato fight held annually in this Spanish Mediterranean town. (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)

Brace Yourself For Some Seriously Messy Photos Of Spain's La Tomatina Festival

Things got seriously messy at Spain's annual La Tomatina festival on Wednesday ― just as organizers hoped. Some 22,000 people pelted around 150 tons of ripe tomatoes at each other during the epic food...

Diwali Can Be A Deadly Drug

The increasingly frequent blasts slicing the blanketed murmur of nature during this Diwali reminded me of what this festival has come to be equated with—noise. Not the pleasant kind, but the kin...
Rita Banerji

Photo Essay: I'm Dreaming Of A Calcutta Christmas...

For Calcutta, Christmas is an event where the city celebrates its centuries-old history and its multitudes of immigrant communities, cultures and religions in a manner that they retain their uniqueness, even as they blend, seamlessly, into one big celebration. It's an experience I've not witnessed with any other religious festival in India or anywhere else. It is this joy I share here with a set of pictures I took as I went around the city yesterday, enjoying its pre-Christmas celebration.

A 6-Step Guide To Detoxing After Diwali (Or Any Time!)

Now that the festive lights have been packed away, it's time for a reality check. It's time to bid adieu to copious quantities of sugar and fats and welcome some real food in our lives. Your body wants to get back to normal and is probably screaming for a cleanse. Below are some simple steps you can use to get back on track. The best part is that you can use these clean eating habits any time of year.
PKG Photography via Getty Images

Sita's Diwali: A Futuristic Festival For Women

Like the original, Sita's Diwali will also be celebrated with lamps. And, the lamps of Sita's Diwali will also symbolise the victory of truth over injustice. But it will be a different truth, and a different injustice. And it will be about a whole different victory. The protagonist of Sita's Diwali will, of course, be Sita. Not just because this is her story, but because Sita is the original "India's Daughter". She is one figure in Indian history and mythology whose life singularly encompasses the truth of Indian womanhood in its entirety.
Pacific Press via Getty Images

Karva Chauth: A Womanly Celebration Of Cultural Misogyny

There is a cultural explanation for Indian women's fixation on their husbands' long lives. Whether a man lives or dies ultimately defines how his wife is socially perceived and treated! A married woman is called Sumangala -- the fortunate one, the bringer of good luck. A widow, on the other hand is called Amangala -- the unfortunate one, the bringer of bad luck. The reverse logic does not apply to men.

Durga And Puja

My mother, amused by my strong dislike for the city, had commented that I sure will come back and might even have a lifelong connection with Calcutta. In the arrogance of my youth, I told her that could never happen and vowed never to return. As luck would have it, in just a few years, I was married to a certain Mr. Kar and in another few years owned a house there -- my mother had the last laugh.
The Way of Slow Travel/Flickr

At Puri, It's Time For The Gods To Be Reborn

This summer, give regular getaways a miss to witness the grand celebration of Nabakalebara in Puri, Orissa. This occasion, which usually takes place every 19 years (it was last celebrated in 1996), sends the temple town into a flurry of activity with the onset of summer. After all, this is the time that the presiding deities -- Lord Jagannath, Balbhadra, Subhadra and the Sudarshan (a weapon) -- get a fresh lease of life, quite literally.
Dhaka Bangladesh

Tagore's Collective Arts and Secular Festivals: From Bengal To Bangladesh

Tagore conceived of the Utsav (festival in Bengali) as a celebration of diversity that included all. An Utsav for him represented a holistic celebration of human society, which presented an opportunity for aesthetic experience and creativity and, very importantly, appreciation of the gift of nature. These secular festivals continue to this day in Shantiniketan. However, nowhere does one find a truer, finer and grander expression of Tagore's original idea of an inclusive and artistic festival than in Bangladesh.