ENTERTAINMENT

10 Writers We Wish Would Finally Make It To The Jaipur Literature Festival

A wishlist.

20/10/2016 1:01 PM IST | Updated 20/10/2016 10:01 PM IST
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Jaipur Literature Festival.(Photo by Purushottam Diwakar/India Today Group/Getty Images)

Ten years ago, few in India would have expected to hear Margaret Atwood give a public talk, at least not one that wasn't hosted by an educational institution. Cut to the Jaipur Literature Festival (JLF) 2016 — and there she was, in Jaipur, giving the keynote address to hundreds gathered on the main lawn of the Diggi Palace, the festival venue.

In its one decade of existence, JLF has brought writers from far and near to thousands of readers in India. From JM Coetzee to Oprah Winfrey, the stridently reclusive as well as the wildly popular names in the world of culture have graced the dais at JLF. Writers and performers from across India, little known to the English-speaking elite, have also become visible to legions of readers thanks to the diversity of the panels at JLF.

But literary fandom will always have an ever-growing list of names they want to see at JLF one day. As we do too. Here's our wishlist to the organisers of JLF: Since this year's list of speakers is being gradually revealed — 10 names over 10 weeks — who knows, some of these wishes may even come true!

Ho New / Reuters
Japanese writer Haruki Murakami speaks during a ceremony where he was awarded the "XXIII Premi Internacional Catalunya" prize in Barcelona, June 9, 2011. REUTERS/Generalitat de Catalunya/Handout (SPAIN - Tags: SOCIETY MEDIA)

Haruki Murakami: Each year, around the time of the announcement of the Nobel Prize for Literature, there's euphoria about Murakami's possible win, followed by a wave of outrage, by fans on social media. An obvious favourite for thousands of JLF-attendees too, were he to come to Jaipur, the snaking queues to enter the festival will certainly run for several miles.

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Alice Munro in 2013. (AP Photo/Paul Hawthorne, File)

Alice Munro: The acclaimed short-story writer is a recluse — her daughter had to collect the Nobel Prize on her behalf in 2013. Her quiet and elegant style may seem incongruous with the overwhelming ethos of JLF, but her fans, we can bet, would love to hear her still.

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Neil Gaiman at the Comic-Con International on Sunday, July 21, 2013, in San Diego. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)

Neil Gaiman: The closest that this living legend for fans of fantasy and graphic novels has come to JLF is through an exchange on Twitter involving Stephen Fry and JK Rowling this year. We can scarcely imagine what it must be for him to appear among thousands of his fans on the grounds of the Diggi Palace.

Robert Galbraith / Reuters
George R.R. Martin at the season premiere of HBO's "Game of Thrones" in San Francisco, California March 23, 2015. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith

George RR Martin: The idiosyncratic creator of the Game of Thrones. Need we say more?

Neil Hall / Reuters
J.K. Rowling poses for photographers at a gala performance of the play Harry Potter and the Cursed Child in London, Britain July 30, 2016. REUTERS/Neil Hall/File Photo

JK Rowling: We need say even less. Just two words: Harry Potter. (There were rumours of her coming to JLF in 2011 but sadly, they were only that — rumours)

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John Green, author of "The Fault in Our Stars," poses during an interview in New York on Monday, June 2, 2014. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

John Green: Having made millions of young, as well as real, adults sob with his bestseller, The Fault in Our Stars, it is only fair that Green should allow his fans in India a chance to take selfies with him!

Stephen Chernin / Reuters
Toni Morrison in New York in 2003. REUTERS/Stephen Chernin PP05040249 SC/HB

Toni Morrison: One of the most important American writers ever, this Nobel Laureate is a familiar name to many in India, her books widely admired in the country.

Alessia Pierdomenico / Reuters
Aravind Adiga with the 2008 Man Booker Prize. REUTERS/Alessia Pierdomenico (BRITAIN)

Aravind Adiga: He gave India one of the biggest-selling literary novels, The White Tiger, which won the Man Booker Prize. His fame, however, is only matched by his notorious reclusiveness.

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Mario Vargas Llosa on September 7, 2016 in Santander, Spain. (Photo by Juan Manuel Serrano Arce/Getty Images)

Mario Vargas Llosa: A towering figure in the world of Spanish literature, his reputation and popularity among readers in India is closely rivalled by that of Gabriel Garcia Marquez's.

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Amy Schumer accepts the award for Best Actress in a Comedy for "Trainwreck" during the 21st Annual Critics' Choice Awards in Santa Monica, California January 17, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

Amy Schumer: Just the thought of this gutsy stand-up comic talking to a mostly Indian crowd, some with delicate sanskari sensibilities, brings a smile to our faces. We can only anticipate fireworks.

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