Around 60% Of China's Career Women Say No To Second Child: Report

09/05/2016 9:54 PM IST | Updated 15/07/2016 8:26 AM IST
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HANGZHOU, CHINA - OCTOBER 13: (CHINA OUT) A boy touches his pregnant mother's belly on October 13, 2014 in Hangzhou, China. (Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images)

China's new two child policy framed to tackle the deepening demographic crisis has evoked poor response with nearly 60 per cent of the working mothers in the world's most populous nation saying they do not want to have a second child.

According to the report by Chinese job recruitment site, nearly 60 per cent of working mothers in China don't want to have a second child.

The report also found that of the 29.39 per cent of women who had not given birth, 20.48 per cent said they don't want a child, state-run 'China Daily' quoted the report.

A total of 14,290 career women were questioned by the site on their work and life choices.

Asked why they did not want to have a child, more than 56 per cent of interviewees cited upbringing cost as a concern.

The second concern was the amount of time, energy and attention involved. Other concerns included career risks, the pain of childbirth and little faith in their marriages.

More than 70 per cent said they would not consider leaving their jobs to become mothers, while only 18.53 per cent said they would take this into account.

Wang Yixin, a senior consultant at Zhaopin, said most career women think it is impossible to live solely on their husbands' pay checks.

"Other reasons involve their own ambitions. They fear that if they stop working, they will become isolated from a dynamic society and lose their career prospects," Wang said.

The ageing population will swell from 16.1 to 25.2 per cent which could seriously test China's social and economic development, said a new data provided by the Population and Development Studies Centre at the Renmin University of China.

In a bid to shore up the numbers of the younger population, China, the world's most populous country with a total population of 1.35 billion, this year ended its three-decades old one child policy and replaced it with two child as the demographic crisis deepened with sharp rise in the population of old people.

"My mother has urged me to have a child before I'm 30.

However, raising a child in Beijing is a huge financial burden," said Peng Xi, 29, a marketing employee who has been married for two years and is still undecided whether to have a child.

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