Mumbai Mass Murder: Police Probe Split Personality Angle

03/03/2016 5:12 PM IST | Updated 15/07/2016 8:26 AM IST
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People look at the bodies of two among the victims fatally stabbed by a man as they are kept inside an ambulance outside a hospital in Thane, outskirts of Mumbai, India, Sunday, Feb. 28, 2016.A man in western India fatally stabbed 14 members of his family, including seven children, early Sunday before hanging himself, police said. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)

THANE -- Investigators probing the Thane massacre are burning midnight oil to explore the possibility of killer Hasnain Warekar suffering from a "split personality" disorder that might have drove him to slaughter 14 members of his family.

A senior police officer, who is a member of the probe team, today said that they are trying to put together all the pieces of the jigsaw puzzle to figure out the behavioural pattern of the 35-year-old accused with the help of several mental health experts and criminologists to arrive at a conclusion as to what led him to execute the mass murders and whether he was a victim of a spilt or multiple personality.

Also, during searches at his house, certain medicines pointing to psychological symptoms/illness were recovered, which the officer said is likely to give some leads into Hasnain's state of mind before the macabre killings.

Also Read: Mumbai Man Who Murdered 14 Family Members May Have Wanted To Take Them To 'Jannat'

Now, police are trying to locate the pharmacist from where the medicines were procured and the doctor who prescribed them, he said.

According to police, even though locals remember Hasnain as a good-natured and religious man, his dark side came to light on Sunday when he mercilessly butchered 14 of his family members and then ended his life after a weekend feast.

In the last couple of days, the police team has been recording statements of Hasnain's relatives and friends besides the caretaker of the Pardesi Baba Darghah (also known as Durgha Hazrat Gaji Salauddin Shah Baba) which he used to visit often.

Police are also probing into the black magic angle to ascertain whether he was influenced by any such practise or followed any self-styled godman.

When contacted in this regard, the caretaker, however refused to make any comments.

Police had also learnt from neighbours that Hasnain used to slaughter goats for 'kurbani' (sacrifice) ritual and therefore knew how to use a butcher's knife that was used in the crime.

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