Thane Man Murders 14 Members Of His Family, Including 7 Kids, Before Hanging Himself

28/02/2016 11:16 AM IST | Updated 15/07/2016 8:26 AM IST
NEW! HIGHLIGHT AND SHARE
Highlight text to share via Facebook and Twitter
Caspar Benson via Getty Images
A silhouette of a hand holding a knife

THANE, Maharashtra -- In a shocking incident of familicide, a 35-year-old man allegedly killed 14 of his family members and then committed suicide in the Kasarwadavli area. Police suspect a property dispute as the reason over which the murders took place.

The accused, identified as Hasnil Warekar, stabbed 14 members of his family to death, including seven children and six women, and then hanged himself, Thane police PRO Gajanan Kabdule told reporters. Some reports allege that he sedated them and then went about slashing their throats.

The bodies were recovered in the wee hours today by the police, who rushed to the spot upon receiving the information.

Ashutosh Dumbre, joint commissioner of Thane Police told Indian Express, "Prima facie evidence suggests that the accused bolted all the doors of the house and murdered his family while they were asleep with a knife that we found near his body. The accused then hung himself after killing his family. There were three rooms in the house, while he was in a room with his wife and two daughters on the first floor, his parents and sisters were in separate rooms on the ground floor."

One woman, who survived, is being treated at a Thane hospital. According to police, a party had been organised in the house, following which several of Warekar's relatives decided to stay back. Warekar had slit the upper part of the throat of the woman who survived. She screamed for help, following which, her in-laws who live in the neighbouring house rushed to the Warekar residence. However, the doors were bolted from inside.

The bodies have been sent to Thane Civil Hospital for post-mortem, Kabdule said, adding investigation is on.

(With inputs from PTI)

Like Us On Facebook |
Follow Us On Twitter |
Contact HuffPost India

Also see on HuffPost:

India In The 18th Century


More On This Topic