Pranav Dhanawade, Kalyan School Boy, Shatters Records In Incredible 1000 Run Innings

05/01/2016 1:52 PM IST | Updated 29/08/2016 9:40 PM IST
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Mumbai just witnessed an cricket innings that is unlikely to be surpassed anytime soon.

A 15-year-old Mumbai school boy scored 1,009 runs without getting out, becoming the first batsman in history to make 1,000 runs in any form of the game. Pranav Dhanawade's incredible feat came in an innings for his school side KC Gandhi, against Arya Gurukul in the under-16 HT Bhandari Cup inter-school tournament organized by the Mumbi Cricket Association. The majestic knock came off just 323 balls and featured 127 fours and 59 sixes.

Dhanawade's father Prashant drives an autorickshaw. On Monday, after he broke a century-old record and remained unbeaten, he left for home in his father's autorickshaw. "I want my son to become a great cricketer," a proud father told the press after Dhanawade remained unbeaten at 1009 on Tuesday.

Dhanawade, who was representing his KC Gandhi School in Kalyan, was batting on 921 when the game resumed on Tuesday. His 1000th run came after lunch. He has smashed former West Indian captain Brian Lara's record of 501 not out in 1994 in a County match for Warwickshire against Durham.

English cricketer Arthur Collins had scored 628 not out in 1899 but not in first class cricket. Collins scored in a Junior House Match in England. The Maharashtra government has decided to bear Dhanawade's educational and coaching expenses, according to ANI.

Social media has obviously gone into a spin after his knock.

The unchallenged God of cricket wished Dhanawade.

Even on Monday, Dhanawade had broken the record of highest score in school cricket -- Prithvi Shaw’s 546 in 2014-15 -- as he retired unbeaten at 652. This, according to Cricket Country, is also the record for most runs scored in a single day of a multi-day match.

He stands unbeaten on Tuesday at 1002 for 323 balls with an incredible strike rate of over 300.

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