Twitter Removes 140-Word Limit For Direct Messages

13/08/2015 7:49 PM IST | Updated 15/07/2016 8:25 AM IST
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LONDON, ENGLAND - AUGUST 05: Ella Eyre takes a selfie with the Twitter mirror with players (L-R) Mako Vunipola, Matt Kvesic, Lee Dickson, Luther Burrell and Richard Wigglesworth prior to the Carry Them Home England 2015 Dinner held at The Grosvenor House Hotel on August 5, 2015 in London, England. (Photo by David Rogers - RFU/The RFU Collection via Getty Images)

Now your direct messages on Twitter can be as long as you want them to be. The 140-character limit has finally been removed, but will continue to exist for tweets.

The change started rolling out today. Twitter's Sachin Agarwal, product manager for DMs, had mentioned this plan in a June post, which had put the new limit at 10,000 characters. But today's post did not mention that, and the company is implying unlimited length.

"We’ll begin rolling out this change today across our Android and iOS apps, on twitter.com, TweetDeck, and Twitter for Mac. It will continue to roll out worldwide over the next few weeks," Agarwal said in the post.

That means the change might not be immediately visible for people who are using Twitter through the website.

Allowing for longer DMs makes sense both for individuals and businesses. People can talk more among themselves about stuff they see on the social media site. "We want to make sure you can really fluidly move between public and private," Agarwal said in an interview. Customers would be able to get more detailed service responses from businesses via DMs.

Twitter has been pushing for higher usage of the DM feature, perhaps with the aspiration of making it a messaging platform like Whatsapp or Facebook Messenger. Both the Facebook-owned messaging apps have clocked over a billion downloads on Google Play. In March, the company introduced new features for DMs, when it allowed direct messages between users who don't follow each other.

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