What's The Best Country To Be A Mom In?

06/05/2015 4:17 PM IST | Updated 15/07/2016 8:25 AM IST
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Norway's clearly the best place to be a mom says this report. According to this year's Save The Children scorecard, released earlier on Monday, Norway has secured the top spot as the world's best place to be a mother, while India has dropped in its ranks, placing 140th behind countries like Zimbabwe, Bangladesh and Iraq.

A non-profit organisation, Save the Children released its 16th annual Mothers' Index, which rates 179 countries based on five indicators related to maternal health, education, income levels and the status of women.

The U.S. is also not a great place for mothers this year, having dropped to 33rd position, while Somalia remains the worst place in the world, having ranked last this year and last year as well. With Finland and Iceland coming in as second and third best places to be a mother in, the Scandinavian countries and their families certainly seem to be sending a not-so-subtle message to the rest of the world (last year Finland topped the list). Australia is the only non-European country to make it to the top ten, coming at number 9, while Canada, France and Britain have occupied the 20th, 23rd and 24th spot.

According to the Save the Children CEO Carolyn Miles, the data confirmed that a country's economic wealth is not the sole factor leading to happy mothers, but that policies need to be put in place.

Miles also explained that Norway ranked highly because their wealth went towards the well-being and care of mothers and children as a high-priority investment. The final result also determined that mothers are having a tougher time in the world's expanding cities, with survival gaps between rich and poor widening - cities in India, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Nigeria, Peru, Rwanda, Vietnam and Zimbabwe reportedly had the highest gap for child survival, with poor children three to five times more likely to die than their affluent peers.

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