Holi Celebration In India Is Wild As Usual

05/03/2015 6:22 PM IST | Updated 15/07/2016 8:25 AM IST
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Young Indian people celebrating the Hindu festival of Holi by throwing coloured powder called Gulal at each other

Holi celebrations have begun in India, where the two-day festival is marked with colours, sweets, delicious food and bonfires. Here's a sneak preview into how the Hindu festival is being celebrated this year across the country, and also in neighbouring Nepal.

  • NOAH SEELAM/AFP/Getty Images
    Indian revellers dance as during Holi celebrations in Hyderabad on March 5, 2015. Holi, also called the Festival of Colours, is a popular Hindu spring festival observed in India at the end of the winter season on the last full moon day of the lunar month.
  • PRAKASH MATHEMA/AFP/Getty Images
    Nepalese revellers with painted faces gather in celebration of the Holi festival in Kathmandu on March 5, 2015. The Holi festival of colours is a riotous celebration of the coming of spring and falls on the day of the full moon in March every year.
  • NOAH SEELAM/AFP/Getty Images
    Indian revellers play with color during Holi celebrations in Hyderabad on March 5, 2015.
  • Raj K Raj/Hindustan Times via Getty Images
    Indian children, smeared with gulal-coloured powder, smile at the camera during Holi celebrations on March 4, 2015 in New Delhi, India. Festival of colours, fun and frolic Holi bridges the social gap and renew sweet relationships. It is also called Fagun, Vasant Utsav or spring festival as it falls on Phalgun Purnima which comes in February end or early March.
  • Shankar Mourya/Hindustan Times via Getty Images
    Students of Devi Ahilya Vishwavidyalaya celebrate the festival Holi on March 4, 2015 in Indore, India. Festival of colors, fun and frolic Holi bridges the social gap and renew sweet relationships.
  • NOAH SEELAM/AFP/Getty Images
    Indian revellers dance as water is sprayed during Holi celebrations in Hyderabad on March 5, 2015.
  • Raj K Raj/Hindustan Times via Getty Images
    An Indian child buying a water gun from roadside vendors ahead of the occasion of Holi festival on March 4, 2015 in New Delhi, India. Festival of colours, fun and frolic Holi bridges the social gap and renew sweet relationships. It is also called Fagun, Vasant Utsav or spring festival as it falls on Phalgun Purnima which comes in February end or early March.
  • PRAKASH SINGH/AFP/Getty Images
    Indian women tie sacred thread and offer milk and water as they worship around a pile of wood on the eve of Holi or 'festival of colours' in New Delhi on March 5, 2015. Celebrations begin from the eve of Holi with the ritual of Holika Dahan. Holika Dahan, or the burning of demon Holika, is the vital ritual during Holi festival. On the night before Holi, people collect wooden logs and waste materials like broken furniture, clothes, etcetera from their homes, gather it together to burn Holika and this bonfire epitomizes the victory of good over evil.
  • Saikat Paul/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images
    A man covered his face of gulal (coloured powders). Youth of Kolkata busy celebrating Holi along with other parts of country. Holi, the festival of colors, is one of the biggest Hindu holidays celebrated across India.
  • AP Photo/Saurabh Das
    An Indian Hindu devotee from Barsana prostrates amid colors as he prays at the Nandagram temple, famous for Lord Krishna and his brother Balram, during Lathmar holi festival, in Nandgaon, India, Saturday, Feb. 28, 2015.
  • AP Photo/Saurabh Das
    Indian Hindu women from Nandgaon village beat the shield of a man from Barsana during Lathmar festival celebrations in Nandgaon, India, Saturday, Feb. 28, 2015. During Lathmar Holi the women of Nandgaon, the hometown of Krishna, beat the men from Barsana, the legendary hometown of Radha, consort of Hindu God Krishna, with wooden sticks in response to their teasing as they depart the town.
  • AP Photo/Bernat Armangue
    A Hindu widow lies on a sludgy ground filled with a mixture of colored powder, water and flower petals during celebrations to mark Holi, the Hindu festival of colors, at the Meera Sahabhagini Widow Ashram in Vrindavan, India, Tuesday, March 3, 2015. After their husband's deaths many of the women in the ashrams have been banished by their families, for supposedly bringing bad luck, while some move voluntarily to and around the town where devotees believe Lord Krishna was born.
  • AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal
    Indian Hindu widows dance with Bindeshwar Pathak, founder of non-governmental organization Sulabh International, as they celebrate Holi at the Meera Sahabhagini Widow Ashram in Vrindavan, India, Tuesday, March 3, 2015. The widows, many of whom at times have lived desperate lives in the streets of the temple town, celebrated the Hindu festival of colors at the ashram.
  • AP Photo/Saurabh Das
    Indian Hindu devotees smeared with colors, sing songs at the Nandagram temple famous for Lord Krishna and his brother Balram, during Lathmar holi festival, in Nandgaon, India, Saturday, Feb. 28, 2015.

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