5 Popular Myths About Nose Jobs In India Conkered

11/02/2015 3:44 PM IST | Updated 15/07/2016 8:24 AM IST
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Indians need to face the truth: we aren’t happy with our noses. According to Dr Mohan Thomas, medical director of The Cosmetic Surgery Insititute Private Limited, Mumbai and Founder President of the Indian Society of Cosmetic Surgery, 60 per cent of the Indian cosmetic surgery market is dominated by rhinoplasty — in layman’s terms, nose jobs.

The Times of India quoted a 2010 survey of the International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons where India ranked fourth in the world for rhinoplasty, cornering 11.5 per cent of the market.

It’s not just about vanity either. “The reason for such a high percentage is that one-third of these surgeries are revision rhinoplasties,” adds Dr Thomas. The report also said that 55 per cent of the nose jobs surgeons get are those that have gone wrong in the first place, but are hushed up because patients are apprehensive about the social judgement that still influence cosmetic surgery in India.

Cosmetically altering the appearance is a practice still largely uncommon in India and these surgeries can cost anywhere between Rs 40,000 to Rs 2 lakh.

However, a rhinoplasty is more than just skin off your nose. Especially if it is a corrective procedure that can take double the amount of time a normal nose job would take in the first place. Here are a few myths that Indians need to know before they decide to opt for that new nose.

  • Myth: The right nose is out there: you just need to sniff it out
    What we're trying to say is that there's no nose-shopping catalogue! Remember that someone else's nose might not suit you. "The nose in question must match the shape and proportion of the face as well has his/her ethnicity, says Dr Thomas, adding that somebody from the North East corridor would not look appealing with a Punjabi nose. So don't 'power' through if you are not happy with the options your surgeon presents you. Simply say no.
  • Myth: Anybody can do a nose job
    False. "Rhinoplasty is a very complex procedure involving both functional and aesthetic improvement in the nose," says Dr Thomas. "A millimetre on the nose is often equal to a foot." All improvements and measurement should be precise and executed with the highest level of precision. After all, it's a very visible part of your mug, but there is only a limited amount of correction that can be made.
  • Myth: A thin, sharp schnoz is always possible
    "The average Indian patient wants a sharp and thin nose, which is often difficult, as most Indians have thick and oily skin," says Dr Thomas. Additionally (in most Indians) the area on the tip of the nose is covered with a generous fibro-fatty tissue which further obliterates the sharpness of the cartilages below, he adds.
  • Myth: Nose jobs require multiple touch-ups
    Possibly the biggest myth that needs to be cracked! "Multiple surgeries of any body part are shunned by most reputed and experienced surgeons worldwide," says Dr Thomas. "Every time a nose is operated upon there is more scar tissue being piled on, not to mention compromise of the blood supply. A glaring example of this is Michael Jackson’s nose."
  • Myth: Use of An implant or a filler is a nose job
    World class rhinoplastic surgeons rarely or never use alloplastic implants as they prefer to use natural cartilage harvested from the septum or ear, reveals Dr Thomas. As far as fillers are concerned, it is a temporary measure, has limitations and long term effects on the overlying skin is unknown.

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