The Morning Wrap: Dodgy Funding Makes AAP Edgy, President Xi To Visit Pakistan

03/02/2015 9:14 AM IST | Updated 15/07/2016 8:24 AM IST
NEW! HIGHLIGHT AND SHARE
Highlight text to share via Facebook and Twitter
FRED DUFOUR via Getty Images
Chinese President Xi Jinping waits to welcome French Prime Minister Manuel Valls (L) at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on January 30, 2015. Valls is in China on a three-day trip. AFP PHOTO / FRED DUFOUR / POOL (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)

The Morning Wrap is HuffPost India's selection of interesting news and opinion from the day's newspapers


Main News


Though exit polls ahead of the Delhi Assembly elections favour the AAP, allegations of money laundering have rattled its top leadership. The Indian Express found that four companies, which together donated Rs 2 crore to the party, were no more than a small sewing factory, a one room grocery shop with its shutters down, and a defunct post office

Gujarat-based conglomerate, Adani has donated about 50,000 Australian dollars to Australia's ruling Liberal Party last year.The company is excavating Australia's largest mine in Queensland in the north-east of the country at an estimated cost of 16 billion Australian dollars.

Is banking the new bottom-of-the-pyramid goldmine for India Inc? Some of India's top business houses such as Reliance Industries Ltd (RIL) and Aditya Birla Group are among about 100 entities that have applied for licences to set up payment- and small-banking facilities.

To counter India's Obama braggadocio, Pakistan has invited Chinese President Xi Jinping to be the chief guest at Pakistan's national day celebrations next month.


Off The Front Page


Shirin Dalvi, the bureau chief of Urdu daily Avadhnama finds herself in hiding, after courting arrest for publishing Charlie Hebdo's 'Je Suis Charlie' cover.

The censor board edited out the word "Bombay" from a music video on women's safety before allowing its television broadcast, sparking outrage and a social media debate on Monday, though it turns out that decision was taken by the previous Censor Board chief.

They maybe agents of war in Afghanistan but drones have now been co-opted by Meerut's wedding photographers and now substitute for inflexible jibs and light-boys.

After PM Modi renamed the Planning Commission, next in line is the erstwhile UPA government's urban development mission,or JNNURM, named after first PM Jawaharlal Nehru. It will now be known as the Atal Mission for Rejuvenation and Urban Transformation (AMRUT) and be a 10-year programme with a total investment of Rs 2 lakh crore.

The Maharashtra government wants to investigate if a programme organised by comedy collective, All India Bakchod (AIB), and director Karan Johar, had "the right permissions." While the show's ribaldry chagrined fringe groups, it was also a massive hit on YouTube with over four million views in four days. A minister has however tweeted that the state doesn't intend to do "any moral policing."

Malayalam film star Mohanlal earned opprobrium after a live, musical programme he organised, as part of the inaugural National Games ceremony in Kerala, featured lip-syncing performers and pre-recorded music.

The Supreme Court on Monday will ponder the meaning of 'nuisance' to decide whether civic authorities have the right to kill stray dogs that aren't rabid or a threat to humans. This comes after a clash between animal welfare activists and neighbourhood residential groups in Mumbai, who've complained that they are nuisance to public peace.


Opinion


Vijay Prashad in The Hindu says Barack Obama and King Salman of Saudi Arabia must equally account for the ongoing violence in West Asia and both countries' future interventions are unfortunately bound to worsen matters.

Ela Bhatt, in The Indian Express, cautions that Gandhi's advocacy of khadi has been taken "far too literally," and the spirit of his teachings were about examining our relationship with manual labour, self-sufficiency, employment, sustainability and local control.

V Anantha Nageswaran in Mint writes that without an improvement in India's investment environment and business attitudes, lower interest rates will do little to boost the real economy.

More On This Topic