NASA Curiosity Finds New Evidence Of Water On Mars

09/12/2014 12:38 PM IST | Updated 15/07/2016 8:24 AM IST
FILE - This file photo released on June 23, 2014 by NASA, shows NASA's Curiosity Mars rover self-portrait. NASA announced Thursday, Sept. 11, 2014, that the rover has reached the base of Mount Sharp, its long-term science destination since landing two years ago. Officials say drilling could begin as early as next week at an outcrop of rocks called Pahrump Hills. (AP Photo/NASA, JPL-Caltech, MSSS, File)

Washington: NASA's Curiosity rover has found new evidence of water on Mars, indicating that the planet most like Earth in the solar system was suitable for microbial life.

Pictures and other data collected by NASA's Mars rover Curiosity show that rivers once flowed into a lake or lakes at the bottom of Gale Crate, an enormous dimple carved out by an incoming space rock.

NASA said its interpretation of Curiosity's finds in Gale Crater suggests ancient Mars maintained a climate that could have produced long-lasting lakes at many locations on the Red Planet.

The American space agency said Mars's Mount Sharp was built by sediments deposited in a large lake bed over tens of millions of years.

"If our hypothesis for Mount Sharp holds up, it challenges the notion that warm and wet conditions were transient, local, or only underground on Mars," said Indian- American Ashwin Vasavada, who is the Curiosity deputy project scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena.

The thickness of the rock outcrops indicates that the lake must have sloshed around the bottom of 154-km Gale Crater over the course of millions of years, though the lake probably dried up and then reappeared a number of times, the researchers said.

"A more radical explanation is that Mars' ancient, thicker atmosphere raised temperatures above freezing globally, but so far we don't know how the atmosphere did that," he added.

Mount Sharp stands about three miles (5 kilometers) tall, its lower flanks exposing hundreds of rock layers.

The rock layers alternating between lake, river and wind deposits -- bear witness to the repeated filling and evaporation of a Martian lake much larger and longer-lasting than any previously examined close-up.

In a statement NASA said why this layered mountain sits in a crater has been a challenging question for researchers.

"We are making headway in solving the mystery of Mount Sharp," said Curiosity Project Scientist John Grotzinger of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California.

"Where there's now a mountain, there may have once been a series of lakes."

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